Upcoming Events

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February 19, 2017
3:00pm to 5:00pm

Speaker: Bjorn Loven

The Zea Harbor Project, digging on land and underwater from 2002 to 2012, uncovered extensive
archaeological remains of the Athenian naval facilities. The lecture will show how the archaeological
finds inform us about developments from the dawn of Athenian power in the late 6th and early 5th
centuries BC, to the young democracy at the time of the Persian Wars, to the age of empire when
Athens ruled the eastern Mediterranean, and to the waning years of the 4th century BC, when Athens
stood in the shadow of Macedonia.

Fowler A139
February 22, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

Speaker: Dr. Fumie Iizuka, University of Arizona

Monagrillo (ca. 4500-3200 14C BP) is the earliest ceramic of Central America. It is found in Central Panama in shell-bearing middens of the Pacific coast, rockshelters of the Pacific plains, foothills, and the cordilleras, and the Caribbean slopes. People had been farming for thousands of years when they adopted pottery. Population was significantly increasing.

Fowler A222
Matthew Swanson mswanson@ioa.ucla.edu
February 24, 2017
10:30am to 12:00pm

From maps and sketches to artifacts and notebooks, digitizing sources of information is frequently essential to archaeological research. In this workshop, you will learn the basics of cultural heritage photography including establishing a workflow, preparing the copy stand and lighting, and processing images. Alyssa will also present options for more fragile and/or difficult to digitize items.

This workshop is open to Cotsen Institute of Archaeology affiliates and their colleagues.

Digital Archaeology Lab A163
Deidre Whitmore dal@ioa.ucla.edu
February 24, 2017
4:00pm to 6:00pm

Speaker: Dr. Deborah Nichols, Professor, Department of Anthropology, Dartmouth College

Fowler A222
Matthew Swanson mswanson@ioa.ucla.edu
March 1, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

Speaker: Dr. Carlos Severi, Laboratoire d'anthropologie sociale, EHESS, Paris

For linguists, anthropologists and archaeologists, the emblematic image always and everywhere preceded the appearance of the sign. This myth of a figurative language composed by icons, that form the opposite figure of writing, has deeply influenced Western tradition. In my talk, I show that the logic of Native American Indian mnemonics (pictographs, khipus) cannot be understood from the ethnocentric question of the comparison with writing, but requires a truly comparative anthropology.

Fowler A222
Matthew Swanson mswanson@ioa.ucla.edu
March 3, 2017
4:00pm to 6:00pm

Speaker: Dr. Sarah Herr, Principal Investigator, Desert Archaeology Inc.

Fowler A222
Matthew Swanson mswanson@ioa.ucla.edu
March 8, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

Speaker: Dr. Stephanie Pearson, Institut für Archäologie at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany

In the later first century BC, Egyptian material sweeps into Roman houses on an unprecedented scale.

Fowler A222
Matthew Swanson mswanson@ioa.ucla.edu
March 10, 2017
4:00pm to 6:00pm

Speaker: Dr. Manfred Bietak, Professor Emeritus, University of Vienna Institute of Egyptology

Fowler A222
Matthew Swanson mswanson@ioa.ucla.edu
March 15, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

Speaker: Dr. Meredith Cohen, UCLA Art History

Fowler A222
Matthew Swanson mswanson@ioa.ucla.edu
May 19, 2017
4:00pm to 6:00pm

Speaker: Nerissa Russell

Fowler A222
Matthew Swanson mswanson@ioa.ucla.edu