Event: CANCELLED Chauvet Cave: Masterworks of the Paleolithic


Date & Time

March 13, 2020 - 6:30pm to 9:00pm
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Contact Information

Michelle Jacobson
mjacobson@ioa.ucla.edu
Phone 310-825-4004

Location

Royce Hall 314

Event Type

Cotsen Public Lecture

Event Details

Due to the evolving public health situation surrounding COVID-19 this event has been cancelled. The well-being of our Cotsen community and all attendees at our events is of the highest importance to us.

Since its discovery in 1998, the extraordinary rock art of the Chauvet-Pont d’Arc cave in south-central France has been celebrated for its remarkable realism and demonstration of skill never before seen in cave art. Dating back 36,000 years, the myriad paintings of horses heads, mammoths, bears, cave lions, rhinoceroses and more are depicted using “the knobs, recesses, and other irregularities of the limestone to impart a sense of dynamism and three-dimensionality to their galloping, leaping creatures,” according to Smithsonian magazine.

In a very special presentation, Prof. Jean-Michel Geneste, director of the multidisciplinary research program at Chauvet from 2002 to 2017, will provide insights into the worldview of these hunter-gatherers through what is described as the world’s greatest repository of Upper Paleolithic art. He will be joined by award-winning producer Martin Marquet, whose documentary on Chauvet, “The Final Passage,” will be screened for a 30-minute immersive experience traveling through the caverns and natural vaults of the site.

Join us for a wonderful introduction into how “these first manifestations of visual art demonstrate mastery, intention, and symbolism to share, transmit and stage stories with poignant sensitivity in this privileged underground world.”

Friday, March 13, 2020
6:30pm Program  |  8:00pm Reception
Humanities Conference Room, Royce 314


This event is now sold out. Please email Michelle Jacobson at mjacobson@ioa.ucla.edu if you would like to be added to the waitlist.

Co-sponsored by the UCLA Rock Art Archive and the Archaeological Institute of America - Los Angeles