Past Events

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November 9, 2022
12:00pm to 1:00pm

Abstract and Bio: Dr. Sarah A Lacy is a paleoanthropologist and associate professor at California State University Dominguez Hills. Her work on Neanderthals and early modern humans has explored differential oral and respiratory health to understand why we're the only living taxonomic group of humans on the planet today. She is now working with a team in North Macedonia to excavate the site of Uzun Mera, a newly discovered Middle Paleolithic stone tool manufacturing workshop, as well as look for additional sites across the country. This project is also a field school, so that archaeologists in training of all types can participate in a wide variety of excavation and survey methods in a country whose Paleolithic history has only recently begun to be explored.

Location Fowler A222 (Seminar Room)
Contact Sumiji Takahashi
Email sutakahashi@ioa.ucla.edu
Phone 310-825-4169
November 5, 2022
1:45pm to 5:45pm

PDF icon Conference 1 Workshop_flyer.pdf

Link to register for Workshop, Saturday November 5 (afternoon) at the UCLA Mildred E. Mathias Botanical Garden: https://theforgottencanopy.create.fsu.edu/workshop-i/

*Registration for in-person attendance closes on Monday, October 31, 2022 at 5:00 p.m. PST. The conference portion of the event will be also livestreamed on the Center’s YouTube Channel. No registration is needed to watch the livestream.

Link to the conference website: https://theforgottencanopy.create.fsu.edu/


Image Credit: View of a hut, and a dance of the Yuracares Indians, Bolivia. Voyage dans l’Amérique Méridionale, vol. 3. Paris, 1835–1847


This project is made possible through support from the Terra Foundation for American Art, and is co-sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center and UCLA Latin American Institute.




Location UCLA Mildred E. Mathias Botanical Garden
Contact
Email
Phone
November 5, 2022
10:00am to 12:45pm

PDF icon Conference 1 Ecology_flyer.pdf


Link to register for Conference Day 2, Saturday November 5 (morning) at the UCLA Mildred E. Mathias Botanical Garden: http://www.1718.ucla.edu/events/forgotten-canopy-c1d2/

*Registration for in-person attendance closes on Monday, October 31, 2022 at 5:00 p.m. PST. The conference portion of the event will be also livestreamed on the Center’s YouTube Channel. No registration is needed to watch the livestream.

Link to the conference website: https://theforgottencanopy.create.fsu.edu/


Image Credit: View of a hut, and a dance of the Yuracares Indians, Bolivia. Voyage dans l’Amérique Méridionale, vol. 3. Paris, 1835–1847


This project is made possible through support from the Terra Foundation for American Art, and is co-sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center and UCLA Latin American Institute.



Location UCLA Mildred E. Mathias Botanical Garden
Contact
Email
Phone
November 4, 2022
10:00am to 4:30pm

PDF icon Conference 1 Ecology_flyer.pdf


Link to register for Conference Day 1, Friday November 4, at the UCLA William Andrews Clark Memorial Library: http://www.1718.ucla.edu/events/forgotten-canopy-c1d1/

*Registration for in-person attendance closes on Monday, October 31, 2022 at 5:00 p.m. PST. The conference portion of the event will be also livestreamed on the Center’s YouTube Channel. No registration is needed to watch the livestream.

Link to the conference website: https://theforgottencanopy.create.fsu.edu/


Image Credit: View of a hut, and a dance of the Yuracares Indians, Bolivia. Voyage dans l’Amérique Méridionale, vol. 3. Paris, 1835–1847


This project is made possible through support from the Terra Foundation for American Art, and is co-sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center and UCLA Latin American Institute.

Location UCLA William Andrews Clark Memorial Library
Contact
Email
Phone
October 27, 2022
6:00pm to 7:00pm

Register here: https://ucla.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEtf-iqrjMiE9GbpWrFQZUs-gaEOVNF2zKG

Few of the world's premodern polities outside of China achieved the scale or density of urbanism
found in the 9th-15th century Angkor empire, which governed a substantial swath of mainland
Southeast Asia. Angkorian rulers built cities, water reservoirs, stone monuments, and roads that
crisscrossed the empire. Carved images glorify their gods, rulers, and ancestors; inscribed stelae
celebrate political accessions and conquests, and narrate religious merits, economic properties,
and status of the populations. Heng will introduce the ancient metropolis of Angkor and its Khmer
world through recent archaeological findings using historical sources, excavation and remotely
sensed ground survey (LIDAR) data. Heng is the 2022-24 postdoctoral scholar at the Cotsen Institute
and the Program for Early Modern Southeast Asia (PEMSEA). His research interests include religious
change, urbanism, political economy, public archaeology, and heritage management. He was a featured
commentator in "Angkor 3D: The Lost Empire of Cambodia," at the California Science Center IMAX
theater.

Location Zoom
Contact
Email
Phone
October 26, 2022
12:00pm to 1:00pm

Speaker:  

Amr Shahat

Postdoctoral Scholar

Cotsen Institute of Archaeology

Abstract: Preservation of organic food remains from Ancient Egypt is an exceptional aspect of the archaeology in this region. The level of preservation of these materials has contributed to the early development of archaeobotany and radiocarbon dating. In this talk I will present unpublished food remains from Nag ed Deir, a necropolis situated on the eastern bank of the Nile, and Deir el Ballas, a royal palace complex in Upper Egypt, research that continues this link between the humanities and life sciences. The materials were excavated in the early 1900s by George A. Reisner and Albert Lythgoe and are currently housed at the Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. I will discuss the results of interdisciplinary analyses applying archaeobotanical and isotopic methods to plant foods from these two sites to understand the anthropogenic impact of climate changes on the foodways and social structures of predynastic Egypt.

A new non-destructive nano-archaeology method was developed to analyze beer mash to reconstruct early beer composition from Nag ed-Deir, revealing a beer recipe specific to the region. I employed a long stable isotope experiment to identify the source region of specific foods to differentiate between local versus imported species, the latter group being represented by the earliest evidence of pomegranate and domesticated watermelon. These interdisciplinary approaches enable us to reconstruct the social history of none-elite Egyptian foodways as related to regional identities and cross-cultural interactions. The methods I will present expand our theoretical perspectives from the humanities side, while serving the field of life sciences through the isotopic data which highlights the anthropogenic impact of climate changes on foodways and social structure.

Bio: Amr Khalaf Shahat, is a postdoctoral researcher at the Cotsen Institute. He earned his PhD in Egyptian Archaeology and Paleoethnobotany from the Cotsen, and his masters in Egyptology from the University of Memphis. He is interested in the study of Egyptian foodways from tombs and settlements to answer questions related to cultural identities and cross-cultural interaction.

Location Fowler A222 (Seminar Room)
Contact Sumiji Takahashi
Email sutakahashi@ioa.ucla.edu
Phone 310-825-4169
October 19, 2022
12:00pm to 1:00pm

Speaker:  

Celine Wachsmuth

M.A. Student

UCLA/Getty Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials MA

Abstract: One of the requirements for the MA Conservation degree is a nine month (minimum) internship in one or more conservation labs. By the end of my internship year, I will have worked in three different places; the Institute for Aegean Prehistory Study Center for East Crete (INSTAP), the AfricaMuseum, and the Denver Art Museum (and a very exciting one month at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science). In this talk I will give a brief description of the different things I've been up to since starting my third year. This summer I spent six weeks in Crete working on archaeological ceramic, metal, and glass objects from various sites around East Crete. After a break in August to travel and see family, I started my second internship in Belgium. Here I've shifted gears and been heavily involved in the installation process for a contemporary exhibition and treating a wood object going out on a loan. 

Bio: Céline is a third year student in the UCLA/Getty MA program in conservation. She has had the chance to work in many great conservation labs including at the Penn Museum, the Cleveland Museum of Art, a private objects lab in Seattle, a private automaton and horological lab in Seattle, the Anchorage Museum, Fowler Museum, INSTAP, and now the AfricaMuseum. 

Location Fowler A222 (Seminar Room)
Contact Sumiji Takahashi
Email sutakahashi@ioa.ucla.edu
Phone 310-825-4169
October 19, 2022
11:30am to 12:30pm

Speaker: 

Moupi Mukhopadhyay

Ph.D. Student

UCLA Conservation of Material Culture IDP

Abstract: The wall paintings in the Indian state of Kerala belonging to the Kerala mural tradition (7th - 17th century CE) provide important cross-cultural links that contextualize local historical religious practices, trade, and social interactions. The complex color scheme of the paintings is traditionally attributed to the skillful use of only five colors (panchavarna) – black, red, yellow, green and white. However, the available literature on the technical study of the murals does not consistently assign the same material (coloring agent or pigment) to the composition of a single color. For example, while black is generally accepted as lamp black across different publications, the green has been ascribed to green earth, powdered leaves, or combinations of yellow ochre, gamboge, indigo, and even lapis lazuli. Understanding the materials used in specific temple murals, and their possible sources, can help better understand the nature and movements of the agents involved in the creation of these paintings. Advances in material characterization methods have significantly increased the scope of identifying the composition of the colors in murals non-invasively, ideal for the preliminary research required to build a case for a more intensive technical study. Non-invasive fieldwork was conducted on selected temples in Kerala, using a digital single-lens reflex camera (DSLR) for photography as well as Infrared (IR) imaging, and a SPECIM IQ hyperspectral camera for hyperspectral imaging (HSI). Permissions to access the temples allowed for the use of only sunlight as the illumination source, adding to the complexity of the interpretation of the data obtained. The use of Infrared False Color Imaging (IRFC) in conjunction with the analysis of HSI data reveals photophysical characteristics of the pigments which are useful for their identification, and for determining optimal characterization methods for further scientific investigation.

Bio: Moupi Mukhopadhyay is a PhD Candidate in the Conservation of Material Culture Program IDP at UCLA. She is interested in investigating the photophysical and chemical properties of pigments in cultural heritage materials using scientific techniques, to better inform their conservation. Through her research, she aims to develop a better understanding of the materials and technology of the creation of temple wall paintings in Kerala, India.

Location Fowler A222 (Seminar Room)
Contact Sumiji Takahashi
Email sutakahashi@ioa.ucla.edu
Phone 310-825-4169
October 14, 2022
11:00am to 12:00pm

Phidias Unbound: How Robot-Generated Replicas Could Solve the Parthenon Marbles Quandary

Roger Michel
Executive Director, The Institute for Digital Archaeology

CLICK to RSVP

Please submit your questions in advance of the webinar via email to:
hnadworny@support.ucla.edu
by Wednesday, October 12 at 12:00 p.m.

Instructions to join the webinar will be provided once your registration
has been confirmed.

About the program 

The Parthenon Marbles, commonly known as the Elgin Marbles, were removed from the ancient Acropolis of Athens in 1801 by Lord Elgin, British ambassador to the Ottoman Empire. Carved by the sculptor Phidias, they were eventually sold to the British government in 1817 and are housed in the British Museum. Public debate about repatriating the marbles is heated and ongoing.Can the creation of exact copies of the originals resolve the repatriation quandary? Roger Michel, executive director of the Institute of Digital Archaeology, at the University of Oxford, believes the repatriation issue can be resolved with the help of 3-D machining. His research team has developed a robot with the ability to create faithful copies of large historical objects. Michel will explore humanity’s connection to culturally significant objects and the emphasis we place on physical possession. Is possession an inherently colonial concept? Are heritage assets particularly susceptible to being exploited for the purposes of historical revisionism? Under what circumstances can copies provide satisfactory substitutes for original material? These questions will be examined against the backdrop of the IDA’s ongoing Elgin repatriation efforts.

About the speaker:

Roger Michel is the founder and Executive Director of the Institute for Digital Archaeology (IDA). The IDA operates globally, undertaking a huge variety of heritage projects, many of which are aimed at advancing social justice goals.  Its principal partners are the UN, UNESCO and local and national governments.  Mr Michel has published and lectured frequently on various heritage conservation topics.  He was a member of the faculty at BU Law School for 25 years, is an Honorary Fellow of Trinity College (Oxford), and is co-publisher of Arion Magazine.  Mr Michel is a graduate of Harvard and Oxford Universities.

https://conservation.ucla.edu/event/phidias-unbound-how-robot-generated-...

Location
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May 27, 2022
1:00pm to 3:30pm
  • In person followed by pizza

  • Dr. Matthew Robb (chief curator of the Fowler) gave a private tour consisting of in-depth responses to student questions.

Location Fowler Museum
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Email
Phone